31 Of My Favorite Quotes from “One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace For An Exhausted World” by Tullian Tchividjian

onewayloveIt’s possible to push people onto the mission of God and leave them exhausted because you have not immersed all of your work in the gospel. This is one of the things I believe God has revealed to me about the last place I was pastoring. I desperately wanted to see our church push beyond the church walls and make an impact within the community all around us. Yet, as I look back I don’t think I did a good enough job when it comes to leading people to experience the power, beauty and inspiration that is found in the good news of Jesus Christ. When our Christian life becomes focused on what we do and not our identity in Jesus Christ we soon experience burn out, fatigue and disillusionment. The book to your left, “One Way Love“, by Tullian Tchividjian is a needed call to go deeper into the sustaining power of the gospel for every area of life. The book helps us to see the implications of the gospel when it comes to ministry, marriage, parenting and overcoming the insatiable appetite of the sin nature that lives inside each one of us. Here are 31 of my favorite quotes from the book…

  • Anxiety, sleeping pills and performancism. The average high school student has the same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950’s. It turns out the problem was not limited to an age group. In 2007, The New York Times reported that three in ten American women confess to taking sleeping pills before bed most nights. The numbers are so high and unprecedented that some are calling it an epidemic…What I see more than anything else is an unquestioning embrace of performancism in all sectors of life. Performancism is the mindset that equates our identity and value directly to our performance and accomplishments. Performancism casts achievement not as something we do or don’t do but as something we are or aren’t. Those colleges those teenagers eventually attend will be more than the place they are educated-they will be the labels that define the students’ values as human beings in the eyes of their peers, their parents, and themselves. The money we earn, the cars we drive aren’t merely reflective our occupation; they are reflective of us; period. How we look, how intelligent we are, and what people think of us are more than descriptive; they are synonymous with our worth. In the world of performancism, success equals life, and failure is tantamount to death. This is the reason why people would rather end their lives than confess that they’ve lost their jobs or made a bad investment. P. 19-20
  • Is Christianity about what we do? Sadly, the Christian church has not proven to be immune to performancism. Far from it, in fact. In recent years, a handful of books have been published urging a more robust, radical, and sacrificial expression of the Christian faith. I even wrote one of them-Unfashionable:Making A Difference In The World By Being Different. I heartily amen the desire to take one’s faith seriously and demonstrate before the watching world a willingness to be more than Sunday morning churchgoers. That Christians would want to engage the wider community with God’s sacrificial love-living for their neighbors instead of for themselves-is a wonderful thing and should be applauded. The unintended consequences of this push, however, is that if we’re not careful, we can give people the impression that Christianity is first and foremost about the sacrifice we make for Jesus rather than the sacrifice Jesus made for us; our performance for him, rather than his performance for us; our obedience for him rather than his obedience for us. The hub of Christianity is not “do something for Jesus.” The hub of Christianity is “Jesus has done everything for you.” P. 21
  • People leaving the church. Too many people have walked away from the church, not because they are walking away from Jesus, but because the church has walked away from Jesus. P. 22
  • The undomesticated gospel. It is time for us to abandon, once and for all, our play-it-safe religion and get drunk on grace. Two-hundred-proof, unflinching grace. It’s shocking and scary, unnatural and undomesticated, but it is also the only thing that can set us free and light the church-and the world-one fire. P. 25
  • Working hard to keep the love of God. Or maybe it is more subtle than that. Maybe you are a Christian, and you rightly believe that God forgave you your past indiscretions-that was what drew you to him in the first place. But once you made that initial Christian commitment, it was time to get your act together and be serious. We conclude that it was God’s blood, sweat, and tears that got us in, but that it’s our blood, sweat, and tears that keep us in. We view God as a glorified bookkeeper, tallying our failures and successes on His cosmic ledger. We conclude that in order for God to love us, we have to change, grow, and be good. P. 30
  • What is one-way love? Grace doesn’t make demands. It just gives. And from our vantage point, it always gives to the wrong person. We see this over and over again in the Gospels: Jesus is always giving to the wrong people-prostitutes, tax collectors, half-breeds. The most extravagant sinners of Jesus’ day receive his most compassionate welcome. Grace is a divine vulgarity that stands caution on its head. It refuses to play it safe and lay it up. Grace is recklessly generous, uncomfortably promiscuous. It doesn’t use sticks, carrots or time cards. It doesn’t keep score. As Robert Capon puts it, “Grace works without requiring anything on our part. It’s not expensive. It’s not even cheap. It’s free.” It refuses to be controlled by our innate sense of fairness, reciprocity and evenhandedness. It defies logic. It has nothing to do with earning, merit, or deservedness. It is opposed to what is owed. It doesn’t expect a return on investments. It is a liberating contradiction between what we deserve and what we get. Grace is unconditional acceptance given to an undeserving person by an unobligated giver. It is one-way love. P. 33
  • Stories from Tullian’s rebellious days. Grace and Law. My parents were loved in our community, and their friends could see the heartache they were going through with me. I remember two separate instances of people caring enough to ask them for permission to talk with me one-one-one to see if maybe they could get through to me. The first time was early one, when I was still living at home. Their friend picked me up after school, brought me to Burger King, and read me the riot act. “Look at all that God’s given you. You’re squandering everything. Your making your parent’ life a living hell, acting so selfishly, not considering your siblings. You go to a private school. You have this remarkable heritage. Shape up man! Snap out of it! Of course, he was 100 percent right. In fact if he had known the full truth of what I was up to (and what was in my heart), he would have had every reason to be even harsher. But in the first five minutes of this guy talking to me, I could tell where it was going, and I just tuned out. As far as I was concerned, it was white noise. I could not wait for it to be over and for him to drop me back off at home. This first friend was the voice of the law. He was articulating the standard that I was falling short of-and what I should have been doing-and he couldn’t have been more correct. The condemnation was entirely justified. His words have an accurate description of who I was at that moment. But that’s the curious thing about the law and judgment in general: it can tell us who we are, it can tell us the right thing to do, but it cannot inspire us to do that thing or be that person. In fact, it often creates the opposite reaction than the one that is intended. It certainly did for me! I don’t blame the man in question-he was trying to do the right thing. It’s just that his methods completely backfired. The second experience happened about a year and a half later, and by this time I was out of the house. This man called me and said, “I’d love to meet with you.” And I thought, Oh no, another one of my parents’ friends trying to set me straight. But I didn’t want to make things worse between my parents and me, and the free meal didn’t sound too bad either, so I agreed to get together with him. Once we were at the restaurant, he just looked at me and said, “Listen, I know you’re going through a tough time, and I know life must seem very confusing right now. And I just want to tell you that I love you, I’m here for you, and I think God’s going to do great things with you.  Here’s my phone number, If you need anything, call me. I just want you to know that I’m here for you.” And then he switched the subject and started talking about sports. That guy-the second guy-is still a friend of mine to this day. He will forever be marked in my personal history as an example of amazing grace. P. 45-46
  • For people that think they’re good, grace is frustrating. P. 47
  • It’s when we come to the end of ourselves that we come to the beginning of grace. P. 55
  • Steve Brown once told me something I will never forget. he said, “Children will run from the law, and they’ll run from grace. The ones who run from the law never come back. But the ones who run from grace always come back. Grace draws its own back home. P. 57
  • I’ll never forget hearing Dr. Doug Kelly (one of my theology professors in seminary) say in class, “If you want to make people mad, preach law. If you want to make them really, really mad, preach grace. I didn’t know what he meant then. But I do now. P.72
  • Hearing the voice that rids us of anxiety. The gospel of grace announces that Jesus came to acquit the guilty. He came to judge and to be judged in our place. Christ came to satisfy the deep accusation against us once and for all so that we can be free from the judgment of God, others, and ourselves. He came to relieve us of our endlessly exhausting efforts of trying to deal with judgment on our own. The gospel declares that our guilt has been atoned for, the Law has been fulfilled. So we don’t need to live under the burden of trying to appease the judgment we feel; in Christ, the ultimate demand has been met, the deepest judgment has been satisfied. The internal voice that says, “Do this and live” get drowned out by the external voice that says, “It is finished.” P. 73
  • How to alienate your spouse, family, friends or church. Most parents and spouses, siblings and friends-even preachers-fall prey to the illusion that real change happens when we lay down the law, exercise control, demand good performance, or offer “constructive” criticism. We wonder why our husbands grow increasingly withdrawn over the years, why our children don’t call as much as we would like them to, why our colleagues don’t confide in us, why our congregants become relationally and emotionally detached from us. In more cases than not, it happens because we are feeding their deep fear of judgment-by playing the judge. Our lips may be moving, but the voice they hear is that of the law. The law may have the power to instruct and expose, but it does not have the power to inspire or create. P. 81
  • Guilt and fear can be powerful motivators in the short run. What they cannot do is change a heart from self-seeking to self-sacrificing. P. 89
  • Pastors who resent their congregations. It makes me sad that some pastors invoke Mr. Crews’s tactics from the pulpit. Frustrated with their congregation’s failure to come to church enough, get involved enough, give enough money, pray enough, read their Bibles enough, invite their friends enough, so many pastors use their position to send verbal letters. “How can you afford your fancy SUV but not give more to the church? How can you take your kid to their soccer game every Sunday but never bring them to youth group?” Pastors who resent their congregations are just like husbands who resent their wives-the resulting guilt may produce some modified behavior for awhile, but estrangement and rebellion are inevitable. P. 89-90
  • What you didn’t know about Utah. We live in a country where the state most known for its wholesomeness and frugality, Utah, also leads the country in rates of pornography consumption and antidepressant prescriptions. P. 91
  • The one-way love of God meets us in our failures. Our failures make His one-way love that much more glorious. What qualifies us for service is God’s devotion to us-not our devotion to Him. This is as plainly as I can say it: the value of our lives rests on God’s infinite, incomprehensible, unconditional love for us-not our love for Him. Such relief! We can finally exhale! P. 115
  • Love and grace given to the least likely candidates. Zacchaeus was essentially the Bernie Madoff of Jericho. P. 124
  • Grace and preaching. I know what you’re thinking. If the key to inspiring altruism and moral behavior and general well-being is fostering an “attitude of gratitude,” and gratitude is the natural response to the good news of the gospel, why don’t more churches preach grace every week? The common misunderstanding, especially in the church, is that moral compliance comes through responsible instruction and exhortation, that in order to ensure good behavior in our fellow man, we need the law. One of the church’s main tasks, therefore, is to tell people what to do. But that’s not what we see in the story of Zacchaeus, and that’s not what we see in our own lives either. P. 128
  • Behavioral modification. Sadly, while attacks on morality typically come from outside the church, attacks on grace typically come from inside the church. The reason is because somewhere along the way, we’ve come to believe that this whole enterprise is about behavioral modification, and grace just doesn’t possess the teeth to scare us into changing, so we end up hearing more about what grace isn’t than we do about what grace is…Where disobedience flourishes, it is not the fault of too much grace but rather the failure to grasp the depth of God’s one-way love for us in the midst of our transgressions and greed. Grace and obedience are not enemies, not by a long shot. P. 129
  • We attend and promulgate churches that preach “humanity and it improved” rather than “Christ and him crucified” (1 Cor. 2:2). P. 131
  • Grace inspires what the Law demands. P. 135
  • Who am I? Such self-reflection never finds peace in itself. (quoted from German Theologian Oswald Bayer) P. 148
  • Earrings, grace and a cool story about Ruth Graham! For example, I wore earrings back in those days. One in the left, and one in the right. It used to drive my parents nuts. Every time my grandmother-Ruth Graham-came down to visit, she would bring me fresh earrings to wear…It may sound trivial, but it meant the world to me. Everyone else was on my case, and instead of giving me one more thing to rebel against, my grandparents drew me in closer. P. 156
  • We love those who know the worst of us and don’t turn their faces away. (quoted from Walker Percy) P. 157
  • As Doug Wilson put it recently, “Grace is wild. Grace unsettles everything. Grace overflows the banks. Grace messes up your hair. Grace is not tame. In fact, unless we are making the devout nervous, we are not preaching grace as we ought.” P. 180
  • But if a person can be given the space to bask in the Good News for a while (without being hammered with fresh injunctions), we just as often find that the Gospel of grace, in the long run, actually empowers risk-taking effort and neighbor embracing love. P. 188
  • There seems to be a fear out there that preaching grace produces serial killers. P. 190
  • The fact is, the only way any of us ever start to live a life of true obedience is when we get a taste of God’s radical, unconditional acceptance of sinners. The message that justifies is the same message that sanctifies. P. 193
  • The Gospel is not a command to hang on to Jesus. It’s a promise that no matter how weak your faith and how unsuccessful your efforts might be, God is always holding onto you. P. 211
  • For many, their experience in church, theoretically a sanctuary from striving, has perpetuated, not relieved, their exhaustion. P. 213

Reasons To Rehearse The Gospel Daily. Day 27-Mortifying The Flesh With Fullness

REASONS TO REHEARSE THE GOSPEL DAILY

Day 27-Mortifying The Flesh With Fullness

Though saved, I am daily beset by a sinful flesh 127 that always craves those things that are contrary to the Spirit.128 These fleshly lusts are vicious enemies, constantly waging war against the good of my soul.129 Yet they promise me fullness, and their promises are so deliciously sweet that I often find myself giving into them as if they were friends that have my best interests at heart.

On the most basic of levels, I desire fullness and fleshly lusts seduce me by attaching themselves to this basic desire. They exploit the empty spaces in me, and they promise that fullness will be mine if I give into their demands. When my soul sits empty and is aching for something to fill it, such deceptive promises are extremely difficult to resist.

Consequently, the key to mortifying fleshly lusts is to eliminate the emptiness within me and replace it with fullness; and I accomplish this by feasting on the gospel. Indeed, it is in the gospel that I experience a God who glorifies Himself by filling me with Himself. He is the One, Paul says, “who fills all in all.”130 He is the One who “fill[s] all things”with the gifts He gives.131 and He lavishes gospel blessings upon me with the goal that I “be filled up to all the fullness of God.”132 This is the God of the gospel, a God who is satisfied with nothing less than my experience of fullness in Him! The first command God spoke in the Garden was, “eat freely.”133 And with similar insistence He says to me now, “be filled.”134

What happens to my appetites for sin when I am filled with the fullness of God in Christ? Jesus provides this answer: “He who continually comes to Me will never hunger or thirst again.”135 Indeed, as I perpetually feast on Christ and all of His blessings found in the gospel, I find that my hunger for sin diminishes and the lies of lust simply lose their appeal. Hence, to the degree that I am full, I am free. Eyes do not rove, nor do fleshly lusts rule, when the heart is fat with the love of Jesus

Preaching the gospel to myself each day keeps before me the startling advocacy of God for my fullness, and it also serves as a means by which I feast anew on the fullness of provision that God has given to me in Christ. “Eat[ing] freely” of such provision keeps me occupied with God’s blessings and also leaves me with a profoundly enjoyable sense of satisfaction in Jesus. And nothing so mortifies fleshly lusts like satisfaction in Him.

127-Galatians 5. “(19) Now the deeds of the flesh are evident, which are: immorality, impurity, sensuality, (20) idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, outbursts of anger, disputes, dissensions, factions, (21) envying, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these…”

128-Galatians 5:17. “For the flesh sets its desires against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh; for these are in opposition to one another…”

129-1 Peter 2:11. “Beloved, I urge you as aliens and strangers to abstain from fleshly lusts which wage war against your soul.”

130-Ephesians 1. “(22)…the church, (23) which is His body, the fullness of Him who fills all in all.”

131-Ephesians 4. “(7) But to each one of us grace was given according to the measure of Christ’s gift. (8) Therefore it says, ‘When He ascended on high, He led captive a host of captives, and He gave gifts to men.’…(10)…that you may be filled up to all the fullness of God.”

132-Ephesians 3. “(14) For this reason I bow my knees before the Father…(16) that he would grant you, according to the riches of His glory…(19)…that you may be filled up with all the fullness of God.”

133-Genesis 2:16. “The Lord commanded the man, saying, ‘From any tree of the garden you may eat freely;”

134-Ephesians 5:18. “…be being filled [present tense] by the Spirit.”

135-John 6:35. “Jesus said to them, ‘I am the bread of life; he who is coming [present tense] to Me will not hunger, and he who is believing [present tense] in Me will never thirst'” [literal translation]

 

Reasons To Rehearse The Gospel Daily. Day 26-The Hope Of Heaven

REASONS TO REHEARSE THE GOSPEL DAILY

Day 26-The Hope Of Heaven

The more I experience the riches of Christ in the gospel, the more there develops within me a yearning to be with Christ in heaven where I will experience His grace in unhindered fullness.118 The reason for this yearning is simple: however great may be the present blessings of salvation, they are but the “first fruits of the Spirit,” the first installments of an unimaginably great harvest of glory which I will reap forever in heaven.119

The Apostle Paul could not rehearse gospel blessings in Romans 5-8 without being reminded of his anxious longing for the future glories awaiting believers in heaven.120 Likewise, The Apostle John could not speak of his and his readers’ status as children of God without also relishing the beautification they will experience at the revelation of Jesus Christ.121 Neither will I be able to think long upon gospel blessings without thinking also of the infinite glories which will be mine to enjoy in heaven.

Such a gospel-generated heavenward focus yields enormous benefits to me while on earth. The more hope of seeing Christ in glory releases the purifying influence of heaven upon my life from day to day.122 Also, knowing of the future love that God will show me in glory enables me to love my fellow-saints with a heaven inspired love even now.123 I love others out of the greater fullness that will be given me in glory!

Hope of eternity with Christ in heaven also enables my heart to thrive during the most difficult and lengthy trials here on earth. When looking at the sheer weight of unseen glories to come, my troubles seem light by comparison; and when looking at the staggering length of eternity, my troubles seem fleeting by comparison.124 It is only against the backdrop of a glorious eternity that my circumstances can be seen in such a manner; and the promise of this glorious eternity is part and parcel of the gospel itself.125

Preaching the gospel to myself everyday is a great way to keep myself established in “the hope of the gospel,”126 so that I might experience the practical benefits that such hope is intended to bring here on earth.

118-Philippians 1:23. “But I…[have] the desire to depart and be with Christ, for that is very much better,” 1 Peter 1:13. “…fix your hope completely on the grace to be brought to you at the revelation of Christ Jesus.”

119-Romans 8:23. “…we ourselves, having the first fruit of the Spirit…”

120-Romans 8. “(18) For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us. (19) for the anxious longing of the creation waits eagerly for the revealing of the sons of God…(23)…we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body.”

121-1 John 3 “(1) See how great a love the Father has bestowed on us, that we would be called the children of God, and such we are…(2) Beloved, now we are children of God, and it has not appeared as yet what we will be. We know that when He appears, we will be like Him, because we will see Him just as He is.”

122-1 John 3:3. “And everyone who has this hope fixed on Him, purifies himself, just as He is pure.”

123-Colossians 1. “(4)…we heard of…the love which you have for all the saints; (5) because of the hope laid up for you in heaven, of which you previously heard in the word of truth, the gospel…”

124-2 Corinthians 4. “(16) Therefore we do not lose heart, but though our outer man is decaying, yet our inner man is being renewed day by day. (17) For momentary, light affliction is producing for us an eternal weight of glory far beyond all comparison, (18) while we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

125-Colossians 1:5. “…the hope laid up for you in heaven of which you previously heard in the word of truth, the gospel…”

126-Colossians 1:23. “…continue in the faith firmly established and steadfast, and not moved away from the hope of the gospel…”

 

Reasons To Rehearse The Gospel Daily. Day 25-All Things Crucified, Part II

REASONS TO REHEARSE THE GOSPEL DAILY

Day 25-All Things Crucified, Part II

Thankfully, the gospel teaches me that dying is not an end, but a beginning. For after Christ took up His cross and died, God raised Him from the dead, 108 exalted Him to the highest heaven, 109 and drew Him into His bosom.110 These facts surrounding Christ’s resurrection stand as proof positive that God will not leave me for dead, but will raise me similarly, If I would only allow myself to die. Indeed, on the other side of each layer of dying lie experiences of a life with God that are far richer, far higher, and far more intimate than anything I would have otherwise known.111

In God’s economy, death is the way to life. “Whoever wishes to save his life will lose it,” Jesus says, “but whoever loses his life for My sake, he shall find it.”112 Indeed, the more conformable I am made to the death of Christ, the more I experience freedom from sin 113 and taste the power of the resurrection of Jesus Himself.114 The path to such power is paved with many dyings, and each stage of resurrection is achieved with each incident of dying to myself and reckoning myself dead to sin.115

The more I contemplate the gospel, the more I understand that this “word of the cross” 116 stands as a blueprint for my own life story. The death that Christ died is the death to which I am called is my entry point to union with Christ and life at its fullest.117 So, come what may, I’ll let no one take this death from me!

108-Ephesians 1:20. “…He raised Him from the dead…”

109-Philippians 2. “(8)…He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. (9) For this reason also, God highly exalted Him, and bestowed on Him the name which is above every name.”

110-John 1:18. “No one has seen God at any time, the only begotten God who is [present tense] in the bosom of the father, He has explained Him.”

111-Romans 6:4. “Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism unto death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.”

112-Luke 9:24. “For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake, he is the one who will save it.”

113-Romans 6. “(6) knowing this, that our old self was crucified with Him, in order that our body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be slaves to sin; (7) for he who has died is freed from sin.”

114-Philippians 3. “(8)…I count all things to be loss in view of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them but rubbish so that I may gain Christ…(10) that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death;”

115-Romans 6:11. “Even so consider yourselves to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus.”

116-1 Corinthians 1:18. “For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”

117-Romans 6:5. “For is we have become united with Him in the likeness of His death, certainly we shall also be in the likeness of His resurrection…”

118-Philippians 1:23. “But I…[have] the desire to depart to be with Christ, for that is very much better,” 1 Peter 1:13. “…fix your hope completely on the grace to be brought to you at the revelation of Christ Jesus.”

 

Reasons To Rehearse The Gospel Daily. Day 24-All Things Crucified, Part I

REASONS TO REHEARSE THE GOSPEL DAILY

Day 24-All Things Crucified, Part 1

The gospel is not simply the story of “Christ, and Him crucified”98; it is also the story of my own crucifixion. For the Bible tells me that I, too, was crucified on Christ’s cross.99 My old self was slain there,100 and my love affair with the world was crucified there too.101 The cross is also the place where I crucify my flesh and all its sinful desires.102 Truly, Christ’s death and my death are so intertwined as to be inseparable.

God is committed to my dying every day, and He calls me to that same commitment.103 He insists that every hour be my dying hour, and He wants my death on the cross to be as central to my own life story as is Christ’s death to the gospel story. “Let this same attitude be in you,” He says, “which was also in Christ Jesus…who became obedient unto death, even death on a cross.”104

Crucifixion hurts. In fact, its heart-wrenching brutality can numb the senses. It is a gasping and bloody affair, and there is nothing nice, pretty, or easy about it. It is not merely death, but excruciating death.

Nevertheless, I must set my face like a flint 105 toward the cross and embrace this crucifixion in everything I do. I should expect everyday to encounter circumstantial evidence of God’s commitment to my dying; and I must seize upon every God-given opportunity to be conformed more fully to Christ’s death, no matter the pain involved.

When my flesh yearns for some prohibited thing, I must die. When called to do something I don’t want to do, I must die. When I wish to be selfish and serve no one, I must die. When wanting to cling to wrongs done against me, I must die. When enticed by allurements of the world, I must die. When wishing to keep besetting sins secret, I must die. When wants that are borderline needs are left unmet, I must die. When dreams that are good seem shoved aside, I must die.

“Not My will, but Yours be done,” Christ trustingly prayed on the eve of His crucifixion;106 and preaching His story to myself each day puts me in a frame of mind to trust God and embrace the cross of my own dying also.107

98-1 Corinthians 2:2. “For I determined to know nothing among you except Christ Jesus, and Him crucified.”

99-Galatians 2:20. “I have been crucified with Christ…”

100-Romans 6:6. “knowing this, that our old self was crucified with Him, in order that our body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be slaves to sin;”

101-Galatians 6:14. “But never may it be that I would boast, except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.”

102-Galatians 5:24. “For those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.”

103-Luke 9:23. “And He was saying to them all, ‘If anyone wishes to come after Me, he must deny himself, and take up his cross daily and follow me.”

104-Philippians 2. “(5) Have this attitude in yourselves which was also in Christ Jesus, (6) who…(7)…emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men. (8) Being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.”

105- Isaiah 50. “(6) I gave My back to those who strike Me, and my cheeks to those who pluck out my beard; I did not cover my face from humiliation and spitting. (7) For the Lord God helps Me, therefore I am not disgraced,…I have set my face like flint, and I know that I shall not be ashamed.”

106-Luke 22:42.”…Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from Me; yet not my will, but Yours be done.” 1 Peter 2:23. “…He…kept entrusting Himself to Him who judges righteously.”

107-1 Peter 2. “(21) For you have been called for this purpose, since Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example for you to follow in His steps, (22) who committed no sin, nor was any deceit in his mouth; (23) and while being reviled, He did not revile in return, while suffering He uttered no threats, but kept entrusting Himself to Him who judges righteously; (24) and He Himself bore our sins in His body on the cross, so that we might die to sin and live to righteousness…” 1 Corinthians 15:31. “…I die daily.” Romans 8:36. “…we are being put to death all day long…”